Pattern: Cortland Fingerless Mitts| Pomme


Click here for the Cortland Fingerless Mitts $5.00 for the PDF download on Ravelry 

The first pattern from our collection Pomme is out today!

The Cortland Fingerless Mitts are a perfect blend of form and function. They bring warmth and comfort while leaving fingers free to knit. The sport weight yarn of Madelinetosh Pashmina is smooth and delicate. It’s whisper soft blend of merino, silk and cashmere feels like pure luxury. A pretty fish scale pattern adds a lovely texture to the body of the mitts, and the moss stitch cuffs and thumbs are classic.

Pattern Details –

Suggested Yarn
MadelineTosh Pashmina (sport weight)
75% Merino, 15% silk, 10% cashmere
Skein – 360 yards (330m) / 4oz (113g)
For project: approx. 90 yards (82m) / 1oz (28g)
Colorway shown – BegoniaLeaf

1 pair US2.5 (3mm) 9” circular needles,
Or a set of US2.5 (3mm) double pointed needles
1 set US3 (3.25mm) needles

16 stitches & 18 rows per 2 inches
in main stitch pattern. (repeat rows 20-27)

Finished Measurements
3.25in (8.25cm) wide – laid flat
6.5in (16.5cm) long – laid flat
finished weight – 1oz (28g)

Stitch markers
Darning needle for finishing

Pattern Notes
Knit bottom up and seamless. The mitts are also knit inside out because the star stitch is much easier to make when you’re purling the three stitches together.

Pomme – More Sneak Peeks!

We’ll start releasing our new knitting patterns Saturday! Pomme (French for apple) makes us think of early autumn afternoons, crisp cool evenings, scrumptious foods and a deepening autumnal palette of colors. We hope you’re as excited about this upcoming season as we are!

Maxi Skirt to the MAX

Have you ever spent time browsing Pinterest and all of a sudden someone’s pin catches your attention so fiercely that you are inspired to act on it immediately? That is precisely what happened to me last week. One of my friends posted this and I just had to make it.


Simply, bold and billowy, a fabulous combination!

I’m taking a little trip to the Virgin Islands and thought this would be fantastic piece to pack.

First things first, the pattern. Although the skirt is very simple, I decided to use a pre printed pattern, I didn’t rely have time to figure things out, I wanted to hit the ground running. The skirt in the inspiration photo doesn’t have a drop waist, but I think the drop waist will flatter my body shape more and won’t add bulk around my tummy.


So let the fabric search begin. There are few fabric shops near me and the choices they offer are a limited. I googled large black and white polka dots and began scrolling. I found several fabrics that were almost an exact match, but the weren’t cotton. I wanted cotton because it’s easy to sew with, easy to wash and cool, it’ll be hot under all those yards of fabric.  This is what I decided to go with.


The fabric is, Art Gallery Avantgarde Tentative Dot Ink, $9.95 per yard

The pattern required a little over 4 yards of 60 inch wide fabric, the fabric I chose was only 43 inches. After looking at how the pattern is laid out on the fabric, it looked like there would be wasted fabric. I went with my first choice, but ordered 5 yards, and thought I’d fudge it if need be.

So, wash and dry fabric, iron fabric, cut out pieces, check, check, check.

After, I’d cut out all the mandatory pieces, I still had a full yard of fabric left. I pinned the front pieces to the top I was wearing so I could gauge the fullness, and after a few photos and texts with Marie, we decided that I should add a half panel to the front and back.


To make  the front panel I folded the folded the patten piece in half along the centre, and then in half again, inverted the fold and smoothed it out. The important thing is to maintain the angels of the sides and the curve along the hem. The back was a little trickier because of the zip. Each back panel had to be a quarter of the original. The folding followed the same principle as the front. I was a little tight, but I managed to get all three pieces from the extra yard.

The pleated, shorter versions of the pattern are designed with pockets, but the maxi isn’t. I love love love pockets and they were a must for me, so I cut those from the fabric scraps left over. I also had to get a little creative when cutting out the front waist band, it wasn’t cut along the grain as suggested.

The sewing part was really easy, and fairly quick, nothing tricky. I did it all within a day. Roll on holiday because I cannot wait the wear it.


Pattern: Leap Day Hat


Last month I was doing a little research on Leap Day, trying out a few ideas for a Leap Day knit. I discovered that gloves are a traditional Leap Day gift and at first I was excited, “Ohh I could totally design a pair of gloves!”. That is, until I read a bit further and realized why gloves are a Leap Day thing.


Apparently in some cultures Leap Day is sort of Sadie Hawkins-esque, where women are ‘allowed’ (‘scuse me?) to propose marriage to a man. Shocking, I know. Unclutch your pearls, dears. It’s about to get worse. Now, tradition says that if the poor spinster’s proposal is turned down by her lover, he must recompense by gifting her with a dozen pairs of gloves.  That doesn’t sound so awful… But why gloves, you ask?

The reasoning behind this innocuous gesture is really quite cringe-worthy. It’s designed to cushion the blow of rejection by allowing her to cover her hands, thereby concealing the fact that she has no engagement ring. To shield her from the scorn of the world knowing that she’s husband-less. It’s to cover her shame. (oh rly?)

And why so many gloves?  So that she has a pair for every month of a calendar year, because rejection is the humiliating sting that lasts. And lasts. Or so they say.  That little tale of woe kind of turned me off to the idea of Leap Day gloves. :-D  What can I say. I’m a rebel Dotty.  I unabashedly expose my naked ring finger for the world to see! I’m not saying that a husband is a bad thing, quite the contrary. I’m just saying there’s no shame in not having one either.

So in place of shame gloves- here’s a fetching hat! It’s unisex, too. It’s a fun little take on the standard 1×1 ribbed cap. The ribbed panel leans to the left while the ribbing continues in pattern over the whole of the hat.

$4.00 US for the downloadable pattern PDF on Ravelry.

Today through Sunday 3/6 get 29% off the pattern PFD at checkout with code: TAKEALEAP


Big huge thank you to the pattern testers in the Ravelry Pattern Tester forum! Besos!

Happy Leap day everyone!

As a bonus, here’s a little video showing how to do the m1pw (make one purlwise) stitch from our youtube channel, be sure to subscribe for more tutorials!

Pattern details-

Instructions included for both Beanie and Slouchy versions.

8.5in(22cm)wide, at bottom
finished weight – 45g
Suggested Yarn
Woolfolk FAR(100% Merino)
shown in #4 Pewter
142yards (130m/50g) per skein
For project: approximately 1 skein
Gauge in Woolfolk
13 stitches and 16 rows
per 2in(5cm)
k1, p1 ribbing un-stretched
swatch knit on US7(4.5mm)needles

10in(25.5cm)wide, at bottom
finished weight – 84g
Suggested Yarn
Purl SoHo Worsted Twist(100% Merino)
shown in Timeless Navy
164yards (160m/100g) per skein
For project: approximately 1 skein
Gauge in Purl SoHo Twist
11 stitches and 13 rows
per 2in(5cm)
k1, p1 ribbing un-stretched
swatch knit on US7(4.5mm)needles

6 stitch markers
darning needle for finishing

Suggested Needles
US7(4.5mm)double pointed needles



Snowed In: Teapot Cosy

20140203-091157.jpgSnowedInTeacosy2 After tromping about out in the snowy city- it’s not so bad to be snowed in when you have a lovely, cheerful pot of tea. This fun cosy is a quick and pretty knit to help you snug up in these cold and dark February days. It’s knit up in Cascade 220, which has a beautiful range of rainbow colors and is a true bargain at only about $9 a skein. You’ll need less than 90 yards of this so you’ll have loads left over for other cheery projects.

Snowed In Teapot Cosy on Ravelry $3.00 for the PDF knitting pattern

Tag your finished projects #florriemarie or #kniteatrepeat on Instagram or Twitter- we want to see them all! Happy knitting, Marie