Free Pattern: Knit Lamp Shades

lamp, glas bord, ikea, knit, knittingI’ve had this set of two lamps from IKEA for a few years now, and while they’re pretty they were a bit plain. Enter- Knitting! I saw that someone had knit a nice cabled cover for their lamps and I knew I could come up with something pretty for mine. After a bit of playing around this is what I came up with and I thought I’d share it with you. I’m not sure IKEA still sells this particular lamp, but it would work with any lamp of approximately the same dimensions. Small lamp: 11″ high and 4.5″ square. Large lamp: 14″ high and 5.5″ square.

Download for FREE on Ravelry!

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Free Pattern: Crochet Bar Stool Covers

20140610-112257.jpgI finished my bar stool covers. They were fun to make.  There is something very satisfying about the granny circle/square. I’m sure most of you crocheters can look at the picture and reverse engineer how to make them, if you wanted to. I have never written a crochet pattern myself.  It seems simple enough, but when I got out my markers to try to draw a chart it turned into quite a behemoth and quickly got away from me.  I may have to enlist the help of Adobe Illustrator on that one.   I learned how to crochet by reading the tutorials at The Purl Bee. So if your find yourself scratching your head at any of my wording, that’s a great resource.  I also like to hold my ends against the work and crochet over them to eliminate the extra work of weaving in ends later.  In case anyone is wondering these are Spin Stools from Crate & Barrel. The seat is 15″ in diameter.  The colors are the same on both stools, I just reversed the order.

Link to Ravelry Project Page

Simple Text PDF Download on Ravelry

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If your stools are larger or smaller, simply continue the granny bit till the piece is just a smidge smaller than the diameter of the seat, then skip to the last 5 rounds. With crochet it is very easy to manipulate sizing. Eyeballing it (as long as your eyeballing skills are decent) is usually enough.

Until I figure out how to write a proper pattern here is a little crochet recipe of sorts:

Hook Size F

Red Heart Acrylic Yarn

With Color One-

Round 1:

I started with an adjustable loop.

Chain 3 into the loop.

Double crochet 11 times into the loop.

Join round.

Pull the loop taught.

Round 2:

Chain 3 into first space.

Double crochet 1 more time into the same space.

Into each following space, double crochet 2 times.

Join round.

Break yarn and switch to Color Two-

Round 3:

Chain 3 into first space.

Double crochet 2 more times into the same space.

Into each new space, double crochet 3 times.

Join round.

Break yarn and switch to Color Three-

Round 4:

Chain 3 into first space.

Double crochet 3 more times into the same space.

Into each following space, double crochet 4 times.

Join round.

Round 5:

Chain 3 into first space.

Double crochet 3 more times into the same space.

Into each following space, double crochet 4 times.

Join round.

Break yarn and switch to Color Four-

Round 6:

Chain 3 into first space.

Double crochet 4 more times into the same space.

Into each following space, double crochet 5 times.

Join round.

Round 7:

Chain 3 into first space.

Double crochet 2 more times into the same space.

*Single crochet once on either side of the middle (third) double crochet from the previous round.

Into each following space, double crochet 3 times.*

Repeat between * until end of round.

Join round.

Break yarn and switch to Color Five-

Round 8:

Chain 3 into first space.

Double crochet 2 more times into the same space.

Into each following space, double crochet 3 times.

Join round.

Round 9:

Chain 3 into first space.

Double crochet 2 more times into the same space.

Into each following space, double crochet 3 times.

Join round.

Break yarn and switch to Color Six-

Round 10:

Chain 3 into first space.

Double crochet 4 more times into the same space.

Into each following space, double crochet 5 times.

Join round.

Round 11:

Chain 3 into first space.

Double crochet 4 more times into the same space.

Into each following space, double crochet 5 times.

Join round.

Round 12:

Chain 3 into first space.

Double crochet 6 more times into the same space.

Into each following space, double crochet 7 times.

Join round.

Break yarn and switch to Color Five-

Round 13:

Chain 3 into first space.

Double crochet 3 more times into the same space.

*Single crochet into six chain spaces of the previous round’s cluster.

Into each following space, double crochet 4 times.*

Repeat between * until end of round.

Join round.

Round 14:

Chain 3 into first crochet chain space.

Double crochet  into every following chain space.

Join round.

Round 15:

Chain 3 into first crochet chain space.

Double crochet  into every following chain space.

Join round.

Round 16:

Chain 3 into first crochet chain space.

Double crochet  into every following chain space.

Join round.

Round 17: Decreasing

Chain 3 into first crochet chain space.

Double crochet  into every other chain space.

Join round.

Round 18: Decreasing

Chain 3 into first crochet chain space.

Double crochet  into every other chain space.

Join round.

Weave in any tails.  You may have to stretch the cover a little bit to fit it on, but it will go. I find that the snugness helps it not to slip off.

-Marie

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Crochet: Barstool Covers

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20140523-095049.jpgI have these two great metal bar stools at my kitchen table.  They’re the perfect height, and they spin! However they’re metal so they’re coooooold in the winter and in the summer, bare legs stick to them and its always a gamble when you’re getting down. One false move and they try to keep some of said skin. Ouch.

I was fiddling around with crocheted circles the other day, working out a throw idea and I had a brain flash. I could make yarn covers for the stools!  After a few false starts I got into the hooking groove and came up with this little beauty. It took a wee bit of pulling and tugging to get them on after hooking the decreases but they fit well and I’m not concerned about them coming off.  I’m chuffed.

I think for the second stool I will reverse the colors with dark radiating to light.  I’m so glad I learned to crochet.  If anyone wants the instructions I can post them. I haven’t written crochet instructions before so that should be fun! I’ll have to dig out my sharpies for a chart.  -Marie

Here & There: Quilting Edition

 

This post was meant to have Florrie’s story about her hexagons, too… but temperamental internet has kept her from finishing.  She will post hers as soon as she can.  Trust me, you don’t want to miss her project.  Read on for my story –hex

Down at the Flat I was wandering through some few of my favorite blogs a few weeks back and I read about Alicia Paulson of Posie Gets Cozy starting work on some fabric hexagons. It jogged a memory of my mother, an avid quilter, making hexagons when I was a girl and carefully hand stitching them together into a quilt top.  Alicia’s hexagons were so pretty. Shades of pink and cream, green and blue.  The combination of nostalgia and the twitchy fingers of my craft mania meant that it wouldn’t be long before I started some of my own.

I’m an OK seamstress at best, but this seemed easy enough.  I did a little research on construction and Florrie ordered us a few sets of paper hexagons online.  We ended up with 1 1/2 inch and 2 inch paper hexagons.  I was to go up to the Croakery for a long weekend and we were set to get started.  While I was there we took a trip to JoAnn’s (which is extra exciting for me as we don’t have any of them down in the City) and we spent 20 minutes picking out fabrics. Initially I wanted aqua and browns, but the greens kept creeping in and the palette seemed to sort itself out. I bought a quarter of a yard of eight different fabrics, four green and four aqua of varying shades, patterns and intensities.

I knew I wanted to make a small project (a quilt seemed a bit daunting to start in case it turned out making hexagons made my teeth squeak) so I settled on a pillow cover.  Turns out making the hexagons is a quick, easy and pretty fun process. I cut out rough squares (why be fussy and cut a hexagon when you really don’t need to??) with my teeny Ginghers.  You just need to make sure that your fabric squares are big enough to comfortably wrap around the paper pieces. Basting the fabric to the paper was quick and easy, soon I had a decent sized stack and started the work of composing my layout. I settled on diagonal stripes of a dark and light of each color, and laid them out to alternate green/aqua/green and so on. I thought the flower motif might be a bit too twee for what I had in mind.

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Stitching the hexes together turned out to be a breeze. The instructions said to use a whip stitch, but I somehow fell into blanket stitch and it seemed to be fine.  I picked up a 20×13 inch pillow stuffer and got to work making my piece large enough to cover the front. I’m going to make the back with strips of the remaining fabric.

hexpillow

I haven’t decided if I want to fuss around with a zipper yet, or just make a flap. I do plan to line the inside with muslin to make sure no disasters occur while inserting/removing the pillow. Should I do a layer of thin batting for the cover and do a little bit of quilting, too? Decisions, decisions… Also, would anyone be interested in directions for the hexagon pillow? Let me know and I may be able to take the time to create a PDF.      -Marie