Free Pattern: Astoria Cowl

astoria Cowl 4

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Here’s a free new pattern for you for this beautiful, crisp September morning.

This textured cowl is a great beginning knitter project, or an auto pilot knit for a more experienced knitter wanting something easy and familiar to do with their hands. Its knit in the round so there will be no seams to sew, and the simple pattern is completely reversible.

Brooklyn Tweed’s Shelter is a great vehicle to showcase texture, and it blooms and softens up beautifully once blocked. It’s still a wee bit on the scratchy side, as wool goes, so I wouldn’t recommend it if you have overly sensitive skin, but any yarn would be fine for this piece.  I hope you enjoy it!

Download for FREE on Ravelry

Pattern Notes:

Finished Measurements

7.5in (19.5cm) wide
28in (50.8cm) long, folded in half 56in (142.24cm) circumference Finished weight – 4oz (113g)

Suggested Yarn

Brooklyn Tweed (100% Targhee-Columbia Wool) 140yd (128m/50g)
Colorway shown: Snowbound
For project: approx. 320 yards (293m, 113g)


1 pair US8 (5mm) 16” minimum circular needles, or needles to obtain gauge.


9 stitches & 12 rows per 2 inches in stockinette stitch.


Stitch marker

Darning needle for finishing

Free Pattern: Wren Revisited

florriemarie craft hudson knitting heidi robinson wren cowlflorriemarie craft hudson knitting heidi robinson wren cowlflorriemarie craft hudson knitting heidi robinson wren cowlflorriemarie craft hudson knitting heidi robinson wren cowl

Hello knitters and a happy start to autumn to you all! I for one am glad to see the end of summer, and I am looking forward with much anticipation to the cooler season ahead. Florrie and I have loads of ideas, as usual, and we are finding ourselves pulled in so many creative directions. We’re so lucky to have each other to bounce ideas off of, and it’s so much fun and filled with manic panic as we feed off each other’s creative insanity. Our To-Do list is forever growing. We have an inside joke that we have a personal assistant named Brenda that should be test knitting our patterns, getting us coffee, testing our recipes and editing our posts… but we’re never getting it all done because we can never find her! BRENDA!? Where are you! lol

I was looking through my early knitting patterns a little while back and decided to (finally) update the Wren Cowl. Wren is a family name on my sister in law’s side. It has history and it conjures up images for me of the fleet little brown birds, darting through the air. I had just learned the star stitch and I was eager to make it into an accessory, and the simple yet pretty Wren Cowl was born. With a little tinkering I figured out how to make the pattern seamless. But the original pattern was missing some crucial information, I was so new to writing patterns that I didn’t realize how important things like weight and size conversions were. Oops. 🙂  I also neatened up some of the directions, hopefully making things even more clear.

I love the star stitch, but it’s one of those stitches that does tend to get a little bit monotonous, it’s like the moss stitch. I love love love the texture, but it makes me a little bit batty to k1, p1 over a large piece of knitting. I think the results are worth it in the end though. The Wren Cowl is a nice little accessory, so you (hopefully) won’t feel like you’re star stitching into eternity.  Once you get the hang of the purl three together technique, you get into a little rhythm.  If you use a wool with enough yardage it also makes a great single skein project. We all have those impulse buy, single skeins of something luscious. The star stitch is a good choice for solids, as well as a pretty variegated wool.

You can download the FREE PATTERN on RAVELRY.

I’m jumping into deep end of official knitting season with both feet. How about you?


Pre-Season Knitting

The other day I took up my needles after quite a long summer break. I was eager to knit, but having wool so close to my body when the temperatures were above 85 degrees was a little off putting.  the act of sitting on the sofa and knitting was causing me to sweat buckets.  Where’s that polar vortex gone?

I decided to keep it simple and made a cozy cowl using Brooklyn Tweed Shelter. I can’t wait for the temperatures to dip so I can wear it.  This was my first knit with BT and true to it’s name, it’s a loosely spun, rustic, tweedy wool, but it gets a really nice softness to it after blocking. It blooms beautifully and it’s a bit clingy back in on itself so it creates a fabric with really nice structure and great stitch definition. I have a feeling it will be a great choice for color work.
Now for the truly hard part… what do I call the pattern? I’m terrible at this stage of pattern engineering. Lol. -Marie