Free Pattern: Astoria Cowl

astoria Cowl 4

astoria, new, york, city, cowl, scarf, knit, knitting, warm, wool, yarn, free, pattern, florriemarie, heidi, marie, robinson

DSCN0416

IMG_4655

Here’s a free new pattern for you for this beautiful, crisp September morning.

This textured cowl is a great beginning knitter project, or an auto pilot knit for a more experienced knitter wanting something easy and familiar to do with their hands. Its knit in the round so there will be no seams to sew, and the simple pattern is completely reversible.

Brooklyn Tweed’s Shelter is a great vehicle to showcase texture, and it blooms and softens up beautifully once blocked. It’s still a wee bit on the scratchy side, as wool goes, so I wouldn’t recommend it if you have overly sensitive skin, but any yarn would be fine for this piece.  I hope you enjoy it!

Download for FREE on Ravelry

Pattern Notes:

Finished Measurements

7.5in (19.5cm) wide
28in (50.8cm) long, folded in half 56in (142.24cm) circumference Finished weight – 4oz (113g)

Suggested Yarn

Brooklyn Tweed (100% Targhee-Columbia Wool) 140yd (128m/50g)
Colorway shown: Snowbound
For project: approx. 320 yards (293m, 113g)

Needle

1 pair US8 (5mm) 16” minimum circular needles, or needles to obtain gauge.

Gauge

9 stitches & 12 rows per 2 inches in stockinette stitch.

Notions

Stitch marker

Darning needle for finishing

Bitten By the Bug

ImageI learned how to crochet last winter with a class on Craftsy.  I have always been what you might call a knitting snob.  I used to roll my eyes at crochet, and clutch my pearls at the thought of working with acrylic yarn.  “But knitting is so much prettier!”  “I only knit with natural fibers!”  “Crochet is such a grandma thing to do, I may as well get 4 more cats!”  “Crochet is so late 70’s, there’s nothing modern about it at all.”  But I have learned to open my mind a bit. It happened when I was exposed to two things. Bear’s Rainbow Blanket from the Purl Bee, and seeing Heidi Bear’s African Flower pattern on Ravelry. I was astounded that a craft that I considered so ‘tacky’ could make such pretty projects.  I know the dedicated crocheters out there are brandishing their hooks, offended at my words. And I apologize.  In my defense I was exposed to a lot of crocheted toilet paper covers complete with plastic dollies on top as a child.  But my eyes have been opened to the possibilities.

I made my first (gasp) acrylic throw for my sofa last spring.  Its a giant Granny Rectangle.  I didn’t use a pattern, I just made a chain and then made granny stitches in it until it became a rectangle. I love it. Its soft and warm, and I can throw it in the washing machine without thinking twice.  Besides that, if you consider the cost of making a blanket sized project in a nice wool its really prohibitive.  When Florrie and I saw how much the Bear’s Blanket kit cost to make out of Koigu, we fell out of our chairs.  Well played acrylic, well played.

After being bitten by the hook bug, I trolled Ravelry and found that there are a lot of great crochet projects out there. I remember seeing the Purl Bee’s blanket and wracking my brain to figure out a way to make the same squares in knitting,  I tried and tried but it never came out quite right. I believe some clever girl out there did it.  I’m sure if you Googled it you could easily find the free pattern. That’s when I decided that it was time to learn to crochet. Its fast to pick up.  I learned the basics in just about an hour.  That same hour I was making my first clumsy granny squares and soon after that I tried my hand at Heidi’s wonderful African Flower and here are my results!

Image

Not too shabby, eh? Its a fun, easy pattern. I have high regard for what I call “Bang for your buck patterns” and this falls solidly in that category.  You only need to know how to single crochet, chain and double crochet. I think the next thing I need to learn is the join as you go method. The major drawback for crochet (for me anyway) is that the joining and weaving in ends is a process and a half.  I have learned how to capture the ends as i crochet, but joining as I go is still an unknown, but seems right up my alley.  Do any of you have favorite join as you go method? I would be forever grateful if you hooked me up! (I apologize for that terrible, awful pun).

-Marie