Pattern: Leap Day Hat

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Last month I was doing a little research on Leap Day, trying out a few ideas for a Leap Day knit. I discovered that gloves are a traditional Leap Day gift and at first I was excited, “Ohh I could totally design a pair of gloves!”. That is, until I read a bit further and realized why gloves are a Leap Day thing.

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Apparently in some cultures Leap Day is sort of Sadie Hawkins-esque, where women are ‘allowed’ (‘scuse me?) to propose marriage to a man. Shocking, I know. Unclutch your pearls, dears. It’s about to get worse. Now, tradition says that if the poor spinster’s proposal is turned down by her lover, he must recompense by gifting her with a dozen pairs of gloves.  That doesn’t sound so awful… But why gloves, you ask?

The reasoning behind this innocuous gesture is really quite cringe-worthy. It’s designed to cushion the blow of rejection by allowing her to cover her hands, thereby concealing the fact that she has no engagement ring. To shield her from the scorn of the world knowing that she’s husband-less. It’s to cover her shame. (oh rly?)

And why so many gloves?  So that she has a pair for every month of a calendar year, because rejection is the humiliating sting that lasts. And lasts. Or so they say.  That little tale of woe kind of turned me off to the idea of Leap Day gloves. 😀  What can I say. I’m a rebel Dotty.  I unabashedly expose my naked ring finger for the world to see! I’m not saying that a husband is a bad thing, quite the contrary. I’m just saying there’s no shame in not having one either.

So in place of shame gloves- here’s a fetching hat! It’s unisex, too. It’s a fun little take on the standard 1×1 ribbed cap. The ribbed panel leans to the left while the ribbing continues in pattern over the whole of the hat.

$4.00 US for the downloadable pattern PDF on Ravelry.

Today through Sunday 3/6 get 29% off the pattern PFD at checkout with code: TAKEALEAP

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Big huge thank you to the pattern testers in the Ravelry Pattern Tester forum! Besos!

Happy Leap day everyone!

As a bonus, here’s a little video showing how to do the m1pw (make one purlwise) stitch from our youtube channel, be sure to subscribe for more tutorials!

Pattern details-

Instructions included for both Beanie and Slouchy versions.

Beanie:
8.5in(22cm)wide, at bottom
8.5in(22cm)long
finished weight – 45g
Suggested Yarn
Woolfolk FAR(100% Merino)
shown in #4 Pewter
142yards (130m/50g) per skein
For project: approximately 1 skein
127-140yds(128m-45g)
Gauge in Woolfolk
13 stitches and 16 rows
per 2in(5cm)
k1, p1 ribbing un-stretched
swatch knit on US7(4.5mm)needles

Slouchy:
10in(25.5cm)wide, at bottom
10in(25.5cm)long
finished weight – 84g
Suggested Yarn
Purl SoHo Worsted Twist(100% Merino)
shown in Timeless Navy
164yards (160m/100g) per skein
For project: approximately 1 skein
140-145yds(132.5m-84g)
Gauge in Purl SoHo Twist
11 stitches and 13 rows
per 2in(5cm)
k1, p1 ribbing un-stretched
swatch knit on US7(4.5mm)needles

Notions
6 stitch markers
darning needle for finishing

Suggested Needles
US7(4.5mm)9in(23cm)needles
US7(4.5mm)double pointed needles

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Free Pattern: Reversible Liberty Print Sun Glasses Case

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I’ve had a love affair with Liberty print for about 15 years. I still remember the feeling of walking into the Liberty shop on Great Portland Street and seeing bolt after bolt of gorgeous fabric. Any excuse to use this classic beauty is jumped on. I didn’t  quite realize the size of my treasured stash until I was pairing fabrics for this project. Using two small pieces of fabric and a little ribbon, these cases are not only beautiful and practical but a great stash buster. I knocked several of these out in a lazy sunny afternoon.

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Download the free Pattern PDF Liberty Sunglasses Case

WIN A FREE CASE! Check out our Instagram page, like, repost by midnight June 5th and be entered to win!

Step by step directions:

Iron the fabric then cut two 8.5″ squares.

Lay fabric A with the right side facing down. Place a pin 1 1/4″ from top of fabric on both sides.

A little tip;

I originally left a 1″ opening because I wasn’t sure what ribbon I would thread through for the closure. If you have the ribbon already picked out feel free to alter the size of the opening to better fit the ribbon.

 Fold the top edge over 1/4″ and press with iron.

Fold the fabric in half the long way with the right sides together, matching the pins. Starting at the bottom folded edge, sew along the short side (the bottom) and then the long side with a seam allowance of 1/4″. Stop at the pin. Snip the bottom corner off.

Press open the seams. Make sure you press the long edge seam so it lays over and hides the edge of the top 1/4″ fold.

Repeat the above steps with square B.

Turn piece A so the right side of the fabric faces out. Piece B remains inside out.

Squeeze and wiggle B into A. B should be inside out. It’s a little fiddly. It’s important here to make sure the tops of A and B are lined up, and the 1/4″ seam allowance is sandwiched between the two pieces.

Pin the two pieces together along the top edge.  Here you can either sew A and B together on the machine with as little seam is humanly possible, or hand stitch them together using a ladder stitch. The latter method is actually my preferred way, I think it’s cleaner looking, even if it takes a little more time.

You’re almost done! Do a couple of tiny whip stitches at the base of the opening to join the two halves.Thread your drawstring through the opening, tie the ends off together and trim any excess if needed.

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I also like to hand sew the top 1/4″ above the opening for the ribbon.

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Free Pattern: Morel Hat

IMG_5979morel, hat, knitting, knit, free, pattern, wheat, stitch, texture, slouchy, hatIMG_5973

I actually cast on for this hat months ago… I bought the wool at Rhinebeck last fall, and I knew I wanted to knit it into a scrumptious, slouchy, textured hat. But then summer happened, and it got set aside. When Florrie came up with that delicious spicy mushroom dish a few weeks ago, an idea was born. We thought that it would be super fun to pair a knit with a recipe. We didn’t use morels in the recipe, but the texture of the wheat stitch in the hat reminded me of morel’s tall textured caps. The recipe is included in the pattern PDF for you to make and enjoy. Both the soup and the hat will warm you up on a chilly fall day. 🙂

Morel features an elongated wheat stitch with pretty eyelet detail at the brim. The ribbing along the brim will stretch to fit many sizes, but there are instructions for a small and large hat. The hat is designed to be unisex, but if you feel that the eyelet is too feminine, you can knit the yarn overs twisted to close them up.

Finished Measurements
Small (Large)
7in (9in) / 18cm (29cm) wide at brim, laid flat
18in (22in) / 46cm (56cm) circ. gently stretched
8in (10in) / 20cm (25.5cm) high, laid flat
Finished weight of large hat 3.5oz/98g
Gauge
8 stitches & 8 rows per 1 inch in wheat stitch.
Needle
1 pair US5(3.75mm) 16in/40.5cm circular needles, or needles to obtain gauge.
1 set US5(3.75mm) double pointed needles
Suggested Yarn
Miss Babs Northumbria DK (100% Bluefaced Leicester Wool) 240yd/3.5oz (225m/100g)
For project: approximately 235yd/3.5oz (215m/98g)
Colorway: Candied Pecan
Notions
Darning needle for finishing

Download the FREE pattern at Ravelry

Free Pattern: Astoria Cowl

astoria Cowl 4

astoria, new, york, city, cowl, scarf, knit, knitting, warm, wool, yarn, free, pattern, florriemarie, heidi, marie, robinson

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Here’s a free new pattern for you for this beautiful, crisp September morning.

This textured cowl is a great beginning knitter project, or an auto pilot knit for a more experienced knitter wanting something easy and familiar to do with their hands. Its knit in the round so there will be no seams to sew, and the simple pattern is completely reversible.

Brooklyn Tweed’s Shelter is a great vehicle to showcase texture, and it blooms and softens up beautifully once blocked. It’s still a wee bit on the scratchy side, as wool goes, so I wouldn’t recommend it if you have overly sensitive skin, but any yarn would be fine for this piece.  I hope you enjoy it!

Download for FREE on Ravelry

Pattern Notes:

Finished Measurements

7.5in (19.5cm) wide
28in (50.8cm) long, folded in half 56in (142.24cm) circumference Finished weight – 4oz (113g)

Suggested Yarn

Brooklyn Tweed (100% Targhee-Columbia Wool) 140yd (128m/50g)
Colorway shown: Snowbound
For project: approx. 320 yards (293m, 113g)

Needle

1 pair US8 (5mm) 16” minimum circular needles, or needles to obtain gauge.

Gauge

9 stitches & 12 rows per 2 inches in stockinette stitch.

Notions

Stitch marker

Darning needle for finishing

Free Pattern: Wren Revisited

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Hello knitters and a happy start to autumn to you all! I for one am glad to see the end of summer, and I am looking forward with much anticipation to the cooler season ahead. Florrie and I have loads of ideas, as usual, and we are finding ourselves pulled in so many creative directions. We’re so lucky to have each other to bounce ideas off of, and it’s so much fun and filled with manic panic as we feed off each other’s creative insanity. Our To-Do list is forever growing. We have an inside joke that we have a personal assistant named Brenda that should be test knitting our patterns, getting us coffee, testing our recipes and editing our posts… but we’re never getting it all done because we can never find her! BRENDA!? Where are you! lol

I was looking through my early knitting patterns a little while back and decided to (finally) update the Wren Cowl. Wren is a family name on my sister in law’s side. It has history and it conjures up images for me of the fleet little brown birds, darting through the air. I had just learned the star stitch and I was eager to make it into an accessory, and the simple yet pretty Wren Cowl was born. With a little tinkering I figured out how to make the pattern seamless. But the original pattern was missing some crucial information, I was so new to writing patterns that I didn’t realize how important things like weight and size conversions were. Oops. 🙂  I also neatened up some of the directions, hopefully making things even more clear.

I love the star stitch, but it’s one of those stitches that does tend to get a little bit monotonous, it’s like the moss stitch. I love love love the texture, but it makes me a little bit batty to k1, p1 over a large piece of knitting. I think the results are worth it in the end though. The Wren Cowl is a nice little accessory, so you (hopefully) won’t feel like you’re star stitching into eternity.  Once you get the hang of the purl three together technique, you get into a little rhythm.  If you use a wool with enough yardage it also makes a great single skein project. We all have those impulse buy, single skeins of something luscious. The star stitch is a good choice for solids, as well as a pretty variegated wool.

You can download the FREE PATTERN on RAVELRY.

I’m jumping into deep end of official knitting season with both feet. How about you?

-Marie

Pre-Season Knitting

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The other day I took up my needles after quite a long summer break. I was eager to knit, but having wool so close to my body when the temperatures were above 85 degrees was a little off putting.  the act of sitting on the sofa and knitting was causing me to sweat buckets.  Where’s that polar vortex gone?

I decided to keep it simple and made a cozy cowl using Brooklyn Tweed Shelter. I can’t wait for the temperatures to dip so I can wear it.  This was my first knit with BT and true to it’s name, it’s a loosely spun, rustic, tweedy wool, but it gets a really nice softness to it after blocking. It blooms beautifully and it’s a bit clingy back in on itself so it creates a fabric with really nice structure and great stitch definition. I have a feeling it will be a great choice for color work.
Now for the truly hard part… what do I call the pattern? I’m terrible at this stage of pattern engineering. Lol. -Marie

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